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20130124
20130201
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of filibusters in the united states senate." it's no surprise that editorials throughout the country have recognized that the use of the filibuster must be changed. "usa today" has noted that -- quote -- "the filibuster has become destructively routine." the "roanoke times" noted that -- quote -- "filibuster reform alone will not fix everything that is wrong with washington but it would remove one of the chief impediments to governing." the minnesota star tribune stated that "most americans live under the impression that representative democracy's basic precept is that the majority will rule. sadly, that's no longer the case in the u.s. senate, where the minority party has so abused the filibuster that the minority now controls the action. or more accurately the inaction. this perverts the will of the voters and should not be allowed to stand." mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that copies of these editorials and others from around the country in support of filibuster reform be inserted into the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. harkin: at issue in this debate is
right now in the united states. what we have, in fact, is a system and senate discuss, it's startling when i heard this. the nation has a demand nearly for 120,000 computer science engineers, but our universities only produce 40,000 people. this is an indictment of our educational system. we need to fix that. we need to get to a point in this country where we have 120,000 people graduating to meet the demand. but in the short term right now we have to deal with the fact that of those 80,000 jobs, those 80,000 graduates are not created here, those jobs are still going to exist. they're just not going to exist here. these companies are not going to wait for us to produce more graduates. these companies are not going to wait for us to fix our immigration system. they have a business to run and if they can't find the people they need to fill these jobs, they will just send those jobs to another country. let me to you what that means in practical terms. the high-paying jobs in these industries will be paying the taxes to some other country, will be simply an economy and some of the country
support. in 2010, 58 united states senators, a large majority, voted to pass this legislation. if we got 58 votes, then why didn't we get it? because of republican obstructionism, we couldn't even proceed to debate the bill. so this was a filibuster on a motion to proceed to the bill. we got 58 votes but we couldn't even debate it. now, since we just went through a recent debate on rules reform, i want the american people to understand this. republicans, the minority party, have continuously prevented the united states senate from even considering the issue of unequal wages and gender discrimination. millions of women and their families are concerned about the fact they get paid less than their male colleagues. it's unfair. it's unjust. nevertheless, repeatedly, the republicans have filibustered even debating the issue. well, now, madam president, just last week we had a vote in the senate to change some rules, so we made some modifications of the rules, and i trawl hop -- ay hope that those modifications that were made will now enable us to get over this hurdle to bring up the paycheck
a budget that indicates what the priorities are for the democrats in the united states senate, and maybe we'll agree on a bipartisan basis to a budget. in any event, we ought not to ignore the law any longer, and i think it's a good step in the direction of getting back to regular order which we ought to follow. it strikes me most of the time, unless there's a pretty strong reason not to do that. >> it's been 1,371 days since the democrats last moved a budget through the united states senate, and thanks to the pressure that was brought by house republicans in passing their no budget, no pay provision as part of the debt ceiling bill that's now come over to the senate, it looks like the senate according to senator murray will now take up a budget. this is important because while republicans believe that spending is the problem not a lack of taxation, it's going to be a revealing exercise to see how this budget markup goes in committee and then, of course, on the floor. and it will be, i'm sure, a challenge for those who believe that more revenue is a solution as opposed to reining in spendin
of 2010. there hasn't been a budget passed in the united states senate since april of 2009. so we are going on four years and now 1,360-some days since the united states senate acted on a budget. that is irresponsible. it is especially irresponsible in light of this problem. we have a responsibility to the taxpayers of this country, as stewards of their tax dollars to do what we can to make sure that we are putting the fiscal house of this country in order in a way that will ensure that future generations of americans have at least as good as, if not better, standard of living and quality of life than what the generation that came before has had. that's not going to happen because we are piling on the backs of future generations enormous amounts of debt. in fact, the $16.4 trillion in debt that the nation has today, if you break that down on an individual basis, that's about $53,000 for every man, woman and child in america. that's what every individual owes, every individual in this country owes of that $16.4 trillion in debt. that is not fair to future generations. and it is up
the nation's economy. it deserves our support in the united states senate. i congratulate speaker boehner on his leadership with regard to this issue and the house for its bipartisan approach to a tough but necessary vote. let us pass this legislation today and move on to debate over what further deficit-reduction options need to keep america's economy moving forward. in the words of lincoln, "the occasion is piled high with difficulty and we must rise with the occasion." thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from utah. mr. hatch: mr. president, right now the federal debt stands at roughly $16.4 trilli trillion. i don't know how anyone can hear that number and not be appalled. nor do i believe there's been -- there will be over ten years $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. in fact, i don't see any deficit reduction except perhaps bringing our soldiers back. but that's not particularly deficit reduction, since it looks like we're going to have difficulty maintaining the military in the -- with the strength that it's had in
-known authority of this body, the united states senate, is likely to be the advise and consent pri provisions. constitution. article 2, section 2, with the advice and consent of the senate the president shall appoint ambassadors and others. and there are about 1, 100 of those that the president appoints. and two years ago and then just last week we streamlined the confirmation process a little bit to narrow the focus on the most important appointees and make it easier to get them confirmed. so those are the checks and balances that the constitution meant to establish. they did that so that we would have liberty from a tyrannical executive branch, which is what the founders were worrying about, and the court is as that i had that the president exceeded that. thertherefore, these two memberf the nlrb should resign immediate lid and pack their bags and go home with our thanks for their hard work despite the fact that the cases they voted on ought to all b be vacated. a new sign needs to go up at the national labor relations board. take down the sign that say, open for business. put up a sign tha
, for this moment of being able to serve in this capacity. there is no one in the united states senate that has spent more time than you have on issues of importance to our country. the experience to develop of being on this committee and spending time abroad with world leaders, your wife at your site today, there's almost no one who has been that kind of time and effort, so i am happy for you. i know the many conversations we have had of the last two weeks. you're very anxious to serve. you're ready to go. my sense is your confirmation will go through very, very quickly. i do look for to your testimony today. secretary clinton is here today after a day of hearings both here and in the house, and that think you know you are inheriting a department that, like many departments, as members of challenges. we solve systemic issues that need to be addressed, and there in the process of being addressed right now. our nation as budgetary constraints, which means that in all of these departments creativity is going to have to be utilized to make sure that we make the most of what we have in making sure
with ourselves. this will only happen if we, the united states senate, summon the political courage and the will to engage in direct good-faith bipartisan efforts to deal with our nation's number-one challenge. perhaps alice rivlin, budget director under president bill clinton, summed it up best -- "there is no mystery about what we ought to do. we just need to get on with it." mr. president, my senate colleagues, republicans and democrats, let's get on with it. with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from utah. mr. hatch: mr. president, i rise today to introduce the immigration innovation or i-squared act of 2013. i'm pleased to be joined here by my colleagues, senator amy klobuchar, senator marco rubio and senator chris coons, without whom this bill wouldn't have materialized. all four of us have worked very closely together and each one deserves total credit for this bill. together we have drafted one of the first bipartisan immigration bills this congress, one that is designed to address the shortage of high-skilled labor that we face in t
it done, we had it done in the united states senate in a bipartisan way, with the help of our friends on the appropriations committee, the republicans and democrats on this senate floor, and the house of representatives let colorado down. and now we're going to have to go back and find a way to make it right. with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the republican whip. the senate is in a quorum call. mr. cornyn: i ask unanimous consent that the quorum call be rescinded. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. cornyn: mr. president, in 2008 a prominent democratic politician said that adding $4 trillion to the national debt was -- quote -- "irresponsible and unpatriotic." in 2009 this same politician said -- quote -- "i refuse to leave our children with a debt they cannot repay." we cannot simply spend as we please. close quote. and again in 2010 this same individual said -- quote -- "it keeps me awake at night looking at all that red ink." a
the prerogatives in the united states senate and the members of congress. you represent the american people come in you or the branch of government coming you have the right to know what took place, and i have an obligation to commensurate with the regulations and the classifications and the other things that are in play to help you get the answers and we will do that and i hope we can do it in an on contentious and appropriate way. >> can i just mention very quickly, i think that you would agree with me that every day that goes by and syria it gets worse. >> every day that goes by gets worse. >> it gets worse, so it seems to me there is a very strong impetus that we realize the present policy is not succeeding and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months and 60,000 dead. >> but i think you would agree with me whatever judgments you have to make you have to pass the test of whether or not if you do them they are actually going to make things better and you have to make a test of a cost analysis and doing that. and i mean all kinds of costs, human life cost, treasure
time to examine those in detail. we haven't used the process that is in place here in the united states senate to go through committees and let the committees work through, is this essential to meeting the emergency needs? or can we set this aside and spend a little more time examining it, looking at it to make sure that this is how we want to go forward? we have a habit here of throwing money at things under an emergency category and then later finding out that, one, it wasn't an emergency where the money went. and, number two, it was misspent and not effective. we simply can't afford to keep doing this. once again i want to state we're not here trying to undermine funding for sandy, needed for sandy. some of the things the house did i think are legitimate in terms of saying let's set aside unrelated matters. it doesn't mean we cast them into the dust bin never to be seen again. it simply means let's let those that are not emergency situations be more carefully examined in terms of whether we need that. and if someone does come to the floor, as senator lee is going to do, is my underst
of almost every politician i know of in the united states senate and congress who when he authored the iranian freedom and security act. he authored the syria accountability act. now, those were not just since the things have percolated in the arab spring, those were well in advance. he knows more about the interactions between ahmadinejad and chavez than i think every politician. so in terms of who our enemy is, where's the war being fought, you know, he was the first one who used the term at the press club in washington, d.c., our enemy is islamofascism. george bush used that term, and then karen hughes said you can't use that term because it might alienate the muslim community. just like in christianity, we have people who handle snakes and speak in tongues and people who might show up on easter and christmas. of that whole realm also spans in islam. i was at a table with -- [inaudible] when he received the reward from a foundation in l.a. which i understand is kind of the largest representative of the jewish community. it was for his holding a conference in indonesia that broug
in the united states. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection, so granted. mr. reid: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the resolution be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table with no intervening action or debate. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask that the preamble also be agreed to. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask unanimous consent that the appointments at the desk appear separately in the record as if made by the chair. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today it adjourn until 9:30 a.m. tomorrow morning, thursday, january 31. following the prayer and pledge, the morning hour deemed expired, the journal of proceedings journal of proceedings be approved for date and the time for the leaders be reserved. following leader remarks the senate proceed to consideration of h.r. 325 under the previous order. following the first vote in relation to the debt limit legislation the senate recess un
and it showed the economy of the united states actually shrank in the last quarter of 2012 with u.s. exports plunging 5.7%. you heard me correctly, the me and getting -- is going more slowly -- growing more slowly, in fact, contracting rather than growing. this news is a sobering reminder that we're still experiencing the weakest economic recovery and the longest period of high unemployment since the great depression. and it has very human consequences. millions of americans are out of work or they're working part time when they wish they could work full time to provide for their families. but we can't create more jobs in this economy unless the economy grows. we must never accept slow growth and high unemployment as the new normal. as i said, these are not just economic concerns, these are human concerns. when millions of people are unable to get full-time jobs, the social and psychological effects can be devastating for individuals, for families, and for entire communities. and yet it seems that the president is no longer focused on the economy. by shutting down the white house jobs counci
to the united states senate. yesterday nearly three decades after the people of massachusetts first voted me into this office, the people i work with in the senate voted me out of it. as always, i accept the senate's sound judgment. eight years ago i admit that i had a very different plan, slightly different anyway, to leave the senate but 61 million americans voted that they wanted me to stay here with you. and so staying here i learned about humility and i learned that sometimes the greatest lesson in life comes not from victory but from dusting yourself off after a defeat and starting over when you get knocked down. i was reminded throughout this journey that something that's often said but not always fully appreciated -- all of us senators are only as good as our staff, a staff that gives up their late nights and weekends, postpones vacations, doesn't get home in time to tuck children into bed. all of those lost moments because they're here helping us serve. they're not elected, they didn't get into public life -- public service to get rich, that's for sure, and their names are rarely in
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16